books

Some of the greatest moms and mother figures in books

Hello everyone!

SORRY, I’D WORKED ON THIS POST FOR A LOOOONG TIME, BUT I COMPLETELY FORGOT TODAY.

Also, I apologise for not posting often. School has kept me slightly busy. And maybe I’m just a little bit lazy. BUT! I did write this post.

I am not going to place them in any particular order because you can’t just rank moms, come on! And I’m going to write about them as actual people, and not just as moms.

Isabel Pullman, Wonder by R.J. Palacio

From Wonder, the movie

Isabel was incredibly brave, caring and supportive. Watching your little boy go through twenty-seven surgeries must be no easy task. She left her job as a children’s book illustrator and homeschooled Auggie all by herself. Homeschooling couldn’t have been easy (she was also hopeless with fractions. Sorry, Isabel). She definitely wrestled with her protectiveness for August while deciding to let him go to middle school or not. She’s always tried to hide her negative emotions from her kids and always tried to show optimism.

Molly Weasley, Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling

Molly in Chamber of Secrets, the movie

Molly Weasley was a queen. She knew her family so well, that she has prison as one of the whereabouts of her family clock. She was a brilliant cook and excelled at household spells. That is an art in itself (Tonks would agree). She also knew her healing spells. After all, she did live with Fred and George. Even though she had four kids to raise, she still found time to play an active role against Voldemort. Mrs Weasley took in Harry and stuffed him with her awesome food. Hermione and he were welcome at the Burrow anytime. She knows how to keep her seven kids in line (though I doubt her third son, Percy, created any trouble). That, everyone, is a talent.

Sally Jackson, Percy Jackson and the Olympians and Trials of Apollo by Rick Riordan

THE ART IS SO GOOD

Sally Jackson is Percy’s real godly parent, and no, I will not be taking any arguments against this. Though, who will? She 1. refused Poseidon’s offer of living in an underwater palace 2. raised Percy, a chaotic demigod, all by herself, 3. married a disgusting and abusive man so her son could be safe, 4. turned that man into a literal STATUE, sold the statue and used the money for putting down a deposit for a new apartment, made a payment on her first semester’s tuition at NYU, and make a deposit at a good school for Percy, 5. successfully got her son to camp when there was a Minotaur, 6. put up with her son going to life-threatening quests, 7. USED A SHOTGUN IN THE BATTLE OF MANHATTAN WITHOUT ANY TRAINING, 8. wrote a book (honestly, I worship nearly anyone capable of writing books), 9. didn’t go out of her mind with worry when Percy was missing for six months (more for Sally because nobody told her about her son being found). Wow, I am so out of breath. After all these reasons, I think everybody agrees when I say, Sally Jackson is a goddess.

Marmee, Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Marmee in Little Women (2019)

Marmee was welcoming, warm and supportive. Her daughters went to her before anyone else when they were going through times of despair and distress and always listened to her daughters’ problems patiently. She also managed to keep her temper in check, which is a great feat in itself, because temper is rather difficult to control. She was a great listener and would not care about her own comfort for others.

Jennifer Honey, Matilda by Roald Dahl

I prefer the book illustration to the movie. πŸ˜€

Miss Honey is awesome. Even though she had an inhumanely cruel aunt (a bit like Dolores Umbridge, when you think about it) and was made to live with her, who she knew had most probably killed her father, as a little girl who was made to do chores all day long, she, unlike a certain Professor in Harry Potter, was not venomous towards her students because she had an abusive childhood. (Not a Snape supporter, sorry not sorry.) She moved out of her family mansion at the age of 18 and lived on a small salary in a tiny cottage. That, readers, takes courage. Let’s be honest, not many of us could be able to do that. Also, she taught small kids. You have to be ultra-ultra patient for that. All in all, we all agree, that Miss Honey rocks. *cue clapping for her* πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»πŸ‘πŸ»

Who are your favourite (sadly fictional) mother figures or mothers? Let me know in the comments! πŸ™‚

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