Harry Potter

My favourite Harry Potter quotes

Because why not? It’ll be from books and movies both!

1. No need to call me sir, Professor.– Harry Potter, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (book)

#fearless

I clearly remember the first time I read this utterly savage quote in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, I put my book down and went, “Oh, damnnnnnnn! That must have HURT!” And I still do. Every. Single. Time.

2. Turn to page 394.– Severus Snape, Prisoner of Azkaban (movie)

I love the way Alan Rickman delivered this dialogue, which resulted in it becoming one of the most legendary lines in the Harry Potter fandom.

3. We could have been killed, or worse, expelled.– Hermione Granger, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (book)

How 10-year-old Emma Watson (yeah, she was 10 at the time of shooting the movie) is excellent and made me laugh a lot. And I’m sure I’m not the only one!

4. We’ve got both light and dark inside us. What matters is the part we choose to act on. That’s who we really are.– Sirius Black, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (book)

Sirius could have been a loyal Death Eater to Voldemort, inherit his family’s vast fortune and be the perfect son in general, if he had chosen the Dark side. However, he did not do any of that. He remained loyal to his best friends, godson and The Order of the Phoenix until his last breath and fiercely hated The Dark Lord and his followers. I find that really admirable.

5. Working hard is important. But there is something that matters more: believing in yourself.– Harry Potter, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (movie)

This is so true. It really speaks to me. I can’t verbally express how much I adore this quote. If you don’t believe in yourself, you will immediately lose the will to work hard.

Advertisement
books

Famous Female Authors

Happy Women’s Day to every woman (and future women, like, you know, girls) in the blogosphere!

To celebrate this occasion, I’ll be listing some world-famous female authors.

J.K. Rowling: The Harry Potter author became the first woman on the planet to become a billionaire by writing books. She also writes under the pen name Robert Galbraith.

J.K. Rowling

Louisa May Alcott: The author of Little Women and its sequels (Good Wives, Little Men and Jo’s Boys. She was one of the first women to author books when writing emerged as an option for a living for women.

Jane Austen: The well-known writer of the books Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility was a rebel, a radical and a feminist.

Dame Daphne du Maurier: Daphne du Maurier was a romance novelist, whose stories, ironically, have been described as “moody and paranormal”, wrote books such as Rebecca, Crows, Jamaica Inn and My Cousin Rachel.

Daphne du Maurier
books

Brilliant things about being a bookworm

  • You can get lost in another world when you’re stressed, angry, sad, or any other emotion that brings you down.
  • It makes you more empathetic to people’s experiences because through book characters’ experiences, you come to know of different types of difficulties people go through.
  • It enriches your vocabulary, blah, blah, blah.
  • SO. MANY. GENRES. Sci-fi to travelogues, horror to comedy, you name the genre, you’ll find a book.
  • No trouble coming up with a wish list. You know your state, and you always have an eye on books published by your favourites, and your interests are ever-growing.
  • Ernest Hemingway rightly said, “There is no friend as loyal as a book.” A book will be there for you when no one is.
  • A whole mine of quotes can be found in them, which you can entertain yourself with, or apply in real life.
*uncontrollable laughter*

Or, on a more serious note,

*turns serious*
Interview with a fictional character

Interview with a fictional character (part 8)

Being the Little Women fan I am, I’ll do an interview today! It’s with Theodore Laurence (you may know him better as Laurie)!

Theodore Laurence in Little Women (2019)
Source: https://littlewomen.fandom.com/wiki/Theodore_Laurence

Thrilled to have you with us, Theodore!
TL: Merci, Ms. Tiwari.
Me: [blushes because he said tHANK YOU TO ME IN FRENCH]

Q: Uh- a- a little about yourself, Theodore.
A: I’m Theodore Laurence, better known as Laurie. My wife’s named Amy and a daughter called Elizabeth. My best friend is Jo, who is Amy’s sister. I’m very close to the March family. I live in a house called Parnassus.

Q: How would you describe yourself?
A: I’m generous (I think) and I’m a very jolly sort of person.

Q: How did you feel when you pranked Meg?
A: [blushes slightly] I thought it was a very good idea at first, but when Mrs. March scolded me, I was truly ashamed of myself. I will continue to be embarrassed by the memory forever.

Q: Moving on to good memories. Which incident with Jo was most fun with you in your childhood?
A: All my time with Jo was extremely fun, but the time she cooked was truly hilarious, because the food was horrible, and she was hoping that it would be good. I had kept going on and I was laughing internally all the while! I think Jo must have seen that laughter in my eyes, because she burst out laughing, and we all laughed till tears ran down on our cheeks.
(Note: Chapter 13 of Little Women, ‘Experiments’ for those who don’t remember!)

Q: What’s your favourite quote?
A: “Not in doing what you like, but in liking what you do is the secret of happiness.” -J.M. Barrie.
(Note: I know the timeline doesn’t fit, but this quote seemed very Laurie-like.)

Love having you here, Mr. Laurence!

Signing off,
Snigdha

miscellaneous

Wordle

Deviating from my usual topic, I will be talking about a word game that has set the world on fire: Wordle.

An example of a game of Wordle

If you’re on social media, you may have seen celebrities and ordinary people alike sharing their results of this brainteaser through black, yellow and green box emojis. In this puzzle, you’re supposed to guess the final word only through the boxes. The word can only be 5-lettered. It’s extremely fun, though a tad hard because you receive no clues to what the final word other than the three boxes. What do they signify, you ask?

The green box signifies that the letter of the word is in the word and is the right place.
The yellow box means that the letter is in the word, but not at the right place.
The black box denotes that the letter is not in the word at any place.

I honestly cannot say that I’m addicted to the game because it gives you only one attempt at guessing the word per day. That is best part, if I do say so myself. It prevents addiction. Though I have done it every single day since 21st February! 😜

Here are my results for today’s attempt:

Wordle 252 5/6

🟨🟨⬛⬛⬛
🟨⬛🟨⬛🟨
🟨⬛⬛🟨🟨
⬛🟨🟩🟨🟨
🟩🟩🟩🟩🟩

Interview with a fictional character

Interview with a fictional character (part 4)

Hello!

I’m here with another interview with a fictional character! It’s…. Tom Riddle a.k.a. Lord Voldemort! SH(notSherlockHolmes), a great friend and blogger, gave me this superb idea. Thanks!

Let’s, uh, let’s begin before he decides to go on a killing spree. (Also: He is not aware I am a Muggle-born because I have told him I’m a Muggle-hating pureblood, so please, for your own sake, do not tell him my real blood status.) This interview is placed during the First Wizarding War.

We are, um, delighted to have you with us.
TR: Gosh, can we be done with this already?

Q: A small introduction, please, Mr. Riddle.
A: *snappishly* I’m Lord Voldemort, not Tom Riddle. Don’t call me by my filthy Muggle father’s name. I’m the commander of the Death Eaters. Darkest wizard of all time. Heir of the great Salazar Slytherin.

Q: How would you describe yourself?
A: Dark. Sinister. Sadistic. Not to mention, super cool. 

Q: What’s your greatest wish?
A: To be immortal and rule over the entire world.

Q: What are your talents?
A: I was a brilliant student during my time at Hogwarts and was a great favourite of all teachers, except that Albus Dumbledore. I specialize in Dark magic. I’m also exceptional in duelling. I’m an Occlumens and the best Legilimens. I can fly without a broomstick.

Q: What’re the qualities you look for in a person you’ve just met?
A: They should be loyal to the death. Should be interested in the Dark Arts. Should not be a sissy. Should be atleast half-blood. 

Q: Who’s your favourite Death Eater?
A: Bellatrix and Severus, without a doubt. Oh, and Bartemius Crouch Jr. was quite great too.

We, erm, loved having you with us!

TR: *goes out of the room dramatically, with loads of flourishes of his wand and robes*
Me: *is visibly traumatised*

S-see you! B-bye!

Snigdha (definitely a Muggle-hating pureblood)

Books Worth Reading

Books Worth Reading: Animal Farm

I’m here with another review, and it’s Animal Farm, by George Orwell! (Also, as I’m writing this, I have realised that the two Books Worth Reading posts were published two days in a row, and this is the third! Jeez!)

“Remains our great satire of the darker face of modern history.”- Sir Malcolm Bradbury

Some info (though slightly unnecessary here): Written by George Orwell, published on 17 August 1945 and has 95 pages in the Penguin Books edition.

Cover of Animal Farm (same one as mine)

Theme/s: Corruption of ideals and power.

Genre: Political satire, fiction.

Synopsis: The animals of Manor Farm rebel when one day, Mr Jones, the drunken and lazy man they are forced to call their master, forgets to feed them. The pigs, being the cleverest, take over the farm and promise to remove all terrible inequities of the ranch. But as time passes, the ideals of the envisioned utopia begin to crumble and corruption takes hold of the farm.

Review: Animal Farm is another unputdownable book I’ve read. How George Orwell slowly unravels each of the Seven Commandants is something only the best and the most experienced of authors can manage to do. When I got more curious about this book, I came to know that some of the characters were based on real-life people (Leon Trotsky, a revolutionary who was against Joseph Stalin) served as the base of Snowball’s character). I also found it very interesting that Napoleon was the only animal who was named after an actual human being. George Orwell also showed the various kinds of people though animals, who believe in a communist government, and he did it perfectly. The one who blindly believes and obeys was the horse Boxer. The one who does not care and this government was just another passing phase of their life was the cynical donkey (but ironically, the smartest) Benjamin. The mare Mollie is the one who cannot rid themselves of the notion that they do not have a master anymore. There are so many more personalities that Orwell flawlessly illustrated to the (by now) story-captured reader. Let me tell you this, I will never be tired of rereading Animal Farm and I assure you, you will not too.

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ (5 stars)

Recommendation: Suitable for people interested in political satires and ages 12 and above. 

More by George Orwell: 

  1. 1984 (A book I’m absolutely dying to read)
  2. Burmese Days
  3. Homage to California 
  4. The Road to Wigan Pier
  5. Keep the Aspidistra Flying

Let me know below if you liked Animal Farm, thought it was okay, or disliked it!

Keep reading,

Snigdha

Books Worth Reading

Books Worth Reading: Extra Credit

Second post of Books Worth Reading is here! I’ll be reviewing Extra Credit by Andrew Clements.

Who knew a simple letter could turn a few people’s worlds upside-down?

Some info: Extra Credit is written by Andrew Clements. It was published on 23rd June 2009 and has 183 pages. 

Theme(s): Friendship & cultural and traditional divide.

Synopsis: Abby Carson is going to be held back in Grade 6 if she doesn’t get a B or higher and her quizzes and tests for the rest of the year (four and a half months). So, she has to do an extra-credit project to help her to go to Grade 7. Extra credit project: writing a letter to someone in another country. Sounds simple enough, right? But then, in the country of her pen-pal, things aren’t as simple. 

Review: Abby Carson has to do an extra-credit project to pass Grade 6 and go on to Grade 7 and ends up doing a pen-pal project with someone on the other side of the world as her assignment. Easy, yeah? She chooses the country of Afghanistan. The teacher, Mahamood Jafari, which Abby’s teacher is in contact with selects Sadeed Bayat, the best student in the village of Panjshir. But according to the tradition of the people of Panjshir, a girl talking to a boy is considered improper. So, Sadeed’s sister, Amira dictates the letter in Dari, the local language, and Sadeed translates it to English. But then, Sadeed and Abby’s friendship does not make some people happy. Suddenly, after a shocking incident that happens with Sadeed, stuff doesn’t remain easy anymore. 

One thing I loved about the book (though I’m sure it was intentional as hell) is that Sadeed and Abby were absolute opposites. He was a boy, she was a girl. He was from a conservative culture, she was from an open-minded one. He was an elder sibling, she was the younger one (this may sound a bit stupid to some people, but I like it). He was an excellent student and she wasn’t. There are so many differences between them, but what I adored about Clements’ main characters were that they somehow seemed to understand bits of each other. Not everything, but just some parts. I also liked how Andrew Clements made Abby and Sadeed seem so… real. The story made me keep guessing about what was going to happen next. My favourite parts of Extra Credit were the letters exchanged between Illinois and Panjshir. 

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐/⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Recommendation: Suitable for children of ages 9 and above. 

More by Andrew Clements: 

  • The Report Card
  • Lunch Money
  • Frindle
  • Lost and Found
  • Troublemaker
books

The most frustrating things about being a passionate bookworm

Well, the title says it all. Read on! (Also: the following are just my personal experiences!)

  1. Having to wait for the book(s) to come from Amazon and inwardly cursing the delivery people.
  2. No reading new books while exams are going on. Arghhhhhhh!
  3. Not being able to read the book PDFs. I cannot. At all. I’ve read only one book through a PDF.
  4. Reading books as fast as a cheetah and having to wait for the next month to buy new books.
  5. So I’m reading this book I’ve wanted for eons, but it doesn’t live up to my expectations, and get bored of it very quickly.
  6. SPOILERS! (Need I say more?)
  7. Not being able to rant about books to anyone.
  8. Not being able to write a review or a book you love.
  9. Banging into numerous things while reading and hurting your toe about a thousand time per week.
  10. Seeing your favourite books being adapted into horrible movies.
  11. Not being able to read non-stop.
  12. Someone’s talking to you while you’re on a particularly exciting part of your book.

Is there anything else that happens to you? Let me know in the comments!

Until next time!

Snigdha

Books Worth Reading

Books Worth Reading: Wonder

I am proud to present the first review in the series Books Worth Reading! It’s a review of one of my all time favourites, Wonder.

“Has the power to move hearts and change minds.” – Guardian

Some info: Wonder is written by R.J. Palacio, and was published in 2012. In the edition with the Julian chapter, there are a total of 416 pages.

Synopsis: The perspectives of various characters who entered August Pullman’s life, either when he entered middle school or after it, or they had known him since Auggie was a baby. 

Review: I first read this book when I was in grade 4 or 5, and was unable to appreciate the author’s beautiful personality description of every single character at the time. It’s not told in a direct way, but when the reader reads every perspective, the development of each person is the most brilliant thing ever. Another thing I love about this book is that when you read the perspective, you sink into their persona and find yourself agreeing with mostly everything. One also feels that the person whose perspective you’re reading, did everything for, according to them, the right reasons, and you understand what they were going through, even if you wouldn’t normally really approve of their actions, and that is beautiful. Take Olivia Pullman’s (August’s elder sister), for example. Normally, she was fiercely protective of her brother, and would be rude even to adults when they stared at August’s face. But when she came bacsk from her Grans’s place, she saw Auggie as other people did for a split second. But as you travel further in her feelings, you will understand why she wanted her high school to not know about August. Or what Miranda, Olivia’s best friend and a sister to Auggie, did at her camp. Summer was my favourite character in the story. Yes, she first sat with him because she pitied him, but that pity blossomed in true friendship. There’s only one word to describe R.J. Palacio’s novel: wonderful.

Recommendation: For ages 10 and above.

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Sequels: 

1. Auggie and Me. Perspectives of:

• Julian Albans, the main bully. Name of story: The Julian Chapter 
• Christopher, August’s best friend. Name of story: Pluto
• Charlotte Cody (A classmate of Auggie and first person who was nice to him). Name of story: Shingaling 

2. 365 Days of Wonder (365 precepts collected by Mr. Browne, August’s English teacher.)

3. We’re All Wonders (Picture book, where August tells how everyone is a wonder)

See you!

Snigdha